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Disadvantages of a “Tortoise Mindset” Within the Hiring Process

image_016Do you remember the old adage from Aesop’s Fables, “slow but steady wins the race?” Not a bad philosophy to live by the majority of the time, however, you probably shouldn’t apply this advice to your company’s hiring process especially when you consider the toll it will take on the “candidate experience.” Research has found that companies need an average of 23 days to screen and hire new employees, which is up from 13 days in 2010 [1]. While it’s obviously important to be thorough throughout your hiring process in order to avoid costly mistakes, if the process runs too long, your company could potentially lose out on some of the best talent that’s out there.

Negative Perceptions

The longer the hiring process, the more frustrated candidates become – which will inevitably lead to negative perceptions about your company. In addition, the impression you leave may have a ripple effect on future candidates. A Robert Half study revealed that when forced to endure a lengthy hiring process, nearly 40 percent of job seekers lost interest in the position and elected to pursue other opportunities. Additionally, more than 30 percent indicated that a drawn-out process made them question whether the employer was good at making decisions in other areas of their business [2].  Many candidates view their first and only interaction with a company (during the recruitment process) as a significant indicator of what it’s like to work there – so, if it is poor, then the likelihood of applying in the future is further diminished. Talent acquisition teams trying to build a “talent community” will certainly feel this impact.

Decline in the Quality of Hire and Other Side Effects

You might assume that taking more time to make a hiring decision would result in better hires. While that might be true in some instances, it could also precipitate a falloff in candidate quality due to the fact that top candidates will take themselves out of the running and go elsewhere.  The longer the review process takes the more insecure and disillusioned your best candidates will become.  The top 10 percent of candidates are often gone from the marketplace within 10 days [3]. This is an undeniable reality. The speed at which you engage your candidates is critical when competing head to head with talent competitors. Beyond the obvious fact that you may lose some great candidates along the way, there are some potential side effects which will be felt in other areas of your business including a slowdown in innovation, production schedules, product delays, employee morale, revenue generation and a fatigued work force.

The Buyer Conclusion

Clearly, there are numerous ways in which a slow hiring process will do damage to your company from a recruitment as well as a business standpoint. Fortunately, just by making some minor adjustments, you can improve your situation quickly and rather dramatically. The easiest and perhaps least disruptive steps that can be taken to shorten your hiring cycles merely involve better communication. Did you know that approximately 75 percent of workers who utilize a variety of sources to apply for jobs never hear back from employers [4]? By keeping candidates informed and involved in the process, your organization portrays itself as effective, efficient and considerate of the people they want to join. Maintaining communication with candidates throughout the hiring process should be a priority and is the foundation of a positive relationship with current and future employees.

If you are interested in learning more about how Buyer can help streamline your hiring process, I’d love to hear from you. Contact me, Michael Wishnow, Vice President of Relationship Development, at mwishnow@BuyerAds.com. I can also be reached by my mobile (978) 985-1163 or direct at my office (857) 404-0864.

 

 

[1] https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-to-deal-with-a-long-hiring-process-1453231053

[2] http://www.businessnewsdaily.com/9330-quick-hiring-process.html

[3] https://www.eremedia.com/ere/the-top-12-reasons-why-slow-hiring-severely-damages-recruiting-and-business-results/

[4] https://www.eremedia.com/tlnt/best-ways-to-communicate-with-job-candidates-in-the-social-media-age/

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How Technology is Changing Human Resource Management

image_10Technology is changing every sector of the economy at a rapid pace. One of the biggest changes is in the way that information is shared. When human resources managers are seeking to recruit staff members, post jobs or keep track of applicants, technology is interwoven throughout every process. Consider these three ways in which technology is changing the way that your organization finds, evaluates and trains new people to work in your organization.

Recruiting Through Social Media

More than 92 percent of human resources officers report that they use social media as a recruitment tool [1]. Most adults actively participate in at least one social media network. Human resources teams can post job openings through a variety of methods on social media. They can use a person’s university affiliation, experience, likes and interests on social media as recruitment techniques. Social media also allows for the implementation of viral recruiting techniques. For example, if your company has dozens or hundreds of seasonal jobs to fill, shares and retweets on social media are fast ways to recruit the staff you need.

Digital Job Postings and Applications

Long gone are the days when you had to fax a job advertisement to the newspaper, wait for them to print it and then wait for applications to come in through snail mail. You can now use technology to almost instantaneously deliver job postings to dozens of recruitment websites, university posting services, professional networks and social media outlets. Applicants do not have to carefully print their applications. They can deliver them to you through your platform or send them electronically through email, allowing you to get responses within minutes of posting an opening.

Information Storage and Retrieval

When your recruitment strategies on social media are successful, you could end up with hundreds of applications. Technology facilitates the storage and retrieval of all of this information. When you have another, similar job opening, you can refer to your database and see which qualified applicants might fit the bill. Cloud computing makes it easy and cost-effective to store a great deal of digital information for recruiting.

[1] http://www.gethppy.com/hrtrends/technology-changing-human-resource-management

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What is the Future of Applicant Tracking Systems in Recruiting?

image_16In today’s competitive economy, employers still hold the edge when it comes to filling a job that pays well and offers great benefits. These openings could attract dozens, perhaps hundreds or even thousands of applicants. Sorting through so many applications could take all of your time, which is why applicant tracking systems in recruiting are so important. As many as 50 percent of mid-size employers use these systems while up to 90 percent of large corporations use them [1]. Consider these ways that applicant tracking systems could be of use or change in the future.

Improving the Quality of New Hires

Applicant tracking systems in recruiting will continue to provide an opportunity to boost the quality of the new hires that you bring into your corporation. These tracking systems can help you to use pre-identified standards, such as certain programming languages in computer systems jobs or fluency in Spanish for sales jobs. The automatic selection of candidates with the ideal qualifications helps you to avoid wasting your time reading through applications of people who do not have what you are seeking in a new hire.

Complying with Laws

Now and into the future, you will be able to use applicant tracking systems in your recruiting procedures to comply with local, state and federal hiring requirements. For example, if your organization were to receive a complaint about the recruitment or hiring practices, you could refer to the data collected by your applicant tracking system to back up your practices and provide key details about the numbers of applicants and their demographic information.

Instantaneous Messaging with Applicants

When a fantastic application comes into your tracking system, you may want to contact that person right away and have the individual come in for an interview. The future of tracking systems will allow for instant messaging or calling of the applicant. Being able to quickly contact a fabulous candidate gives your organization the best chance of adding that person to your organization instead of letting the person slip through the cracks and end up with one of your competitors.

 

[1] http://www.hireright.com/blog/2014/02/four-key-benefits-of-an-e-recruiting-solution-ats-applicant-tracking-system/

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The Pros of the Telecommute Perk

image_011Telecommuting began to rise in popularity within the past decade when fuel prices soared. While it immediately benefited employees who would no longer have to spend hundreds of dollars per month to fill their gas tanks, human resources managers also began to notice benefits. Telecommuting is a growing trend – about 40% of U.S. employees are working remotely either full time or part time [1]. If you are considering implementing a telecommuting policy at your organization, keep these pros in mind when making your decisions and setting up the rules of your telecommuting program.

Efficiency

Employees who work from home may be able to start their workdays earlier and end later than they would if they had to commute. They may also experience fewer distractions, such as conversations at the water cooler or disruptions from coworkers chatting rather than working. On the other hand, employees who work at home may become distracted by household chores, the doorbell, television, and spouses or children who are also at home.

Equipment Savings

When employees work from home, your organization may be able to cut on some costs, such as utilities, office supplies and furniture. A typical business could potentially save up to $11,000 per employee per year [2]. When telecommuting employees do come into the office, they may be able to use shared work areas. This might even allow your organization to be housed in a smaller space. Keep in mind that you may have to reimburse your employees for their work-related internet fees, pay phone bills for work calls and provide them with a laptop so that they can do their work from home.

Employee Loyalty and Retaining Staff

The flexibility of being able to telecommute may help to increase the loyalty of your employees. Employees who have young children may appreciate the ability to work from home on days when their childcare center is closed or when their child is sick. You may be able to retain your staff by offering the option of telecommuting one or more days per week. Your employees are sure to enjoy the time savings and experience less stress from not having to drive in weekday rush-hour traffic. The savings on gas and wear and tear on cars also benefits your staff, who may decide to stay with you for these benefits.

[1] http://www.forbes.com/sites/mikekappel/2016/07/27/for-employee-retention-theres-no-place-like-home/#48ca551855ec

[2] http://globalworkplaceanalytics.com/telecommuting-statistics

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Does Your Website Work? How to Ensure You Get the Most from Mobile and Career Pages

image_16Does your company’s website work the way you think and hope that it does? If not, you may not be getting as much attention from prospective applicants who are qualified to work at your organization.

In today’s high-tech world, more than 77 percent of job seekers use the Internet as their primary source for finding leads and scouring open positions, explains an infographic from Beyond.com [1]. More than 84 million Americans use a smartphone to do their Internet searches, which means that your company’s recruiting and career pages need to be performing well in order to capture today’s top candidates.

Mobile Friendly

With most adults using smartphones to access the Internet, your website must be mobile friendly. Rather than having a separate mobile and traditional website, consider using a website with a responsive design. A responsively designed website is user friendly across devices and platforms. Responsively designed websites also rank well on all of the major search engines.

Social Media and Websites for Career Searches

According to a survey from Jobvite (featured on LinkHumans), more than 86 percent of job seekers use social media to find job openings [2]. This means that your organization needs to have both a great career page and an active social media account that is geared toward the type of candidates you are seeking. Your social media links should take guests to your career page or a landing page where users can enter search parameters to find current openings.

The Benefits of Responsively Designed Career Pages

If your organization is looking to hire tech-savvy individuals, a well-designed website is the first step to getting them knocking at your door. This is especially true if you are seeking new graduates who are well versed in the use of technology. Candidates who are highly comfortable with technology will use apps and text alerts to let them know when a job opening fitting their needs has been posted. Keeping your career pages optimized and up to date gets you fast results from candidates across the nation. Now is the time to make sure that your website is designed in a way that works well for all users.

[1] http://about.beyond.com/infographics/mobile-job-search-apps

[2] http://linkhumans.com/social-recruiting/jobseekers-social-media-study

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How Members of the Baby Boomer Generation Can Learn Tech Speak from Millennials

image_04As the Millennial generation enters the workplace in numbers large enough to overtake the Baby Boom generation, there can be a communications chasm between the two groups. Millennials have grown up with in-hand technology, including smartphones and tablets. The Baby Boom generation has had to actively embrace these tools, especially when it comes to using them in the workplace. Forging that communications gap can be done by getting the members of the two generations together in a variety of situations. The Baby Boomers can learn tech speak from Millennials using these three strategies.

Exploit Similarities

One way to get Baby Boomers to start using tech speak is to explore the similarities between talking about tech and talking about any other specialized field of knowledge. Every industry has its own lingo. Take advantage of the similarities by engaging Baby Boomers with Millennials in familiar situations. What used to be a “conference call” may now be referred to as “Skyping,” for example. Moving about on a website used to be called “tabbing” or “paging” but now is just “scrolling.”

Mentoring Programs

Mentoring programs are a great way to get people of different experience levels working together. A member of the Baby Boom generation can be paired with a Millennial for practice opportunities to learn about tech speak. Millennials will benefit from the increased face-to-face interactions as much of their world revolves around digital communications. These mentoring programs do not only have to be among coworkers but can also include college and even high school interns who come into your organization for short periods of time.

Teamwork

Effective engagement can also take place through teamwork. Placing members of different generations into the same working teams in your organization can help everyone to learn each other’s styles of communication. While Millennials often see communication as a way to convey bits of information, the Baby Boom generation may see communications as a way to get to know another person. These ideas can be meshed by having people interact in a variety of ways in the workplace. Seeing a project through from start to finish enhances communication.

 

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Keeping Your Information Secure When Employees Connect to the Internet of Things

image_30The Internet of Things (IoT) is an exciting concept – a future where “billions of things are talking to each other,” as technology consulting company SAP describes it [1]. This trend has been growing at a rapid rate, and you might be surprised to learn that the majority of devices connected to the Internet through your network are not company owned but instead are owned by your employees. When an employee brings in a “smart” device, it starts transmitting and receiving data across your network. These steps can help to keep your confidential and proprietary information secure when your employees are connected to the Internet.

Encourage Employees to Change Habits

Your human resources division should establish a security policy related to the Internet of Things. Some of the most common devices that your employees may be bringing into the workplace that connect to the Internet include wearable fitness trackers, personal smartphones and music players. Your policy might recommend that employees turn off their smartphones and music players during work hours. The phones are constantly transmitting data about the owner’s location, among other pieces of information. Hackers can easily penetrate through the phone’s operating system and into your network.

Use Multiple Layers of Security

Even something as simple as a fitness tracker that is seemingly only used to count steps can be collecting or transmitting data, opening up your network to potential criminals. Make sure that your IT department is employing multiple layers of security. These layers should include strong encryption of data and proper authentication of users trying to access the network. Use gateways and firewalls to stop viruses from getting into your network through mobile devices.

Prepare for Security Breaches

While your organization may not be able to control which employees wear a Fitbit or an Apple Smart Watch to work, you can be prepared for any possible data breaches that occur as a result of vulnerabilities within the network. Consider moving your critical data to the cloud. With cloud computing, your data is always available so that your business can continue operations even if a physical server is hacked. Make sure that your company is not collecting unnecessary data that would be tempting to would-be thieves. All data should be tightly guarded.

[1] http://www.fastcompany.com/3052936/the-future-of-work/how-the-internet-of-things-is-changing-work

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How Mobile Can Play a Pivotal Role in Hiring Quality Staff

image_14Mobile recruiting of candidates is the act of engaging potential employees on a mobile device. This method benefits both the recruiter and the candidate by increasing interactions and making communication more convenient. When developing these connections, human resources staff and hiring managers should consider existing apps and technologies that are already made and able to be customized to their company’s specific recruitment needs.

A Growing Trend

The popularity and convenience of mobile smartphones them a powerful tool for recruiting. A 2014 Glassdoor survey of 1,000 employees and job seekers found that 89% of those surveyed use a mobile device during their job search, and 45% use their mobile device to search for jobs at least once each day [1]. Currently, employers who have embraced mobile recruitment have been focused on two trends in particular: mobile-optimization and mobile applications. Making mobile connections can involve using apps, text message delivery systems on a mobile device in order to aid in the recruitment and job search processes.

Shifting Strategies and Expectations

Mobile connections are creating a paradigm shift in the way that human resources managers are recruiting and communicating with candidates. Gone is the formal written expression of interest, and in its place is a brief text exchange between the HR office and the desirable professional. Texts, chats and short video messages are playing an exceptional role in the recruitment of the Millennial generation as they are comfortable in a world of smartphones, iPads and handheld devices. Given that approximately 75% of the workforce will be comprised of Millennials within the next 10 years, it’s important to consider a mobile recruitment strategy in order to not lose out on potential qualified talent [2].

Leveraging Technology for Recruitment

Recruiting great candidates for your job openings through mobile connections means that you no longer have to be tied to your computer, and neither does the candidate. You can text confirmations and send candidates a Google Map link with directions to your office. Creating a responsive design for your website also helps with mobile connections as this design makes it easier for candidates to scroll through your job listings and initiate an application. Mobile video is the greatest tool for recruitment. You can live stream business activities and provide employee testimonials of your company’s success.

As mobile technology advances and becomes more popular, job seekers want to complete every stage of the process, from the search to the application, from their phones and tablets. More companies are embracing the mobile application and finding ways to make the process easier for candidates.

[1] http://www.inc.com/jerome-ternynck/the-past-present-amp-future-of-mobile-recruiting.html

[2] http://hiring.monster.ca/hr/hr-best-practices/recruiting-hiring-advice/attracting-job-candidates/investing-in-mobile-recruiting.aspx

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Can Facebook Help You Find Quality Talented Professionals?

image_01When your business needs to find talented professionals to join your team, knowing where to look can be a challenge. In today’s social media-driven world, people are flocking to websites such as Facebook not only to share photos and status updates but also to find jobs. Putting your company on Facebook helps to get the word out fast to an audience of interested and skilled professionals.

A recent survey by Facebook found that 70% of respondents agreed that Facebook is an effective recruiting tool because it allows recruiters to cast a wide net and connect with more potential job seekers than other services because of the widespread use of Facebook [1]. With over 1 billion users, Facebook can be a valuable source for recruiting qualified professionals.

Paid Ads

One way to find talented professionals to recruit is through Facebook ads. You can choose how and when your ad appears, so if you are not offering relocation expenses, then you may wish to only have your ad show up when your physical location is within 60 miles of a user’s IP address. You can also try pay-per-click ads, for which you are only charged when someone clicks your advertisement. Facebook ads allow you to specifically target the type of candidates that you desire. For example, if you need someone familiar with Share Point, you would include that in your keywords. You may choose to run the ad constantly or only during specific hours of the day.

Facebook Pages

Facebook pages are a free resource that you can utilize to your benefit. Essentially a profile for your business, this page is public and allows you to update it with your job postings. You can also include pertinent links with information that the best candidates will want to know, such as the health care benefits, amount of paid time off and other perks of working at your company.

Facebook Marketplace

The Facebook Marketplace allows you to place free, basic ads for the job openings available at your business. In a marketplace ad, you are able to include the job description, location, reason why you need to fill the job and other basic information. You are also able to upload an image of the job’s location or any other image that you think would be useful in recruiting skilled employees.

Facebook’s enormous membership, combined with its precise targeting mechanisms, allow recruiters to pinpoint their ideal candidates and leverage them to build an online talent community. Facebook Ads average around $0.25 per 1,000, which is only 1% of the cost of TV advertising [2] – the result is a low-cost, but highly effective recruitment campaign.

 

[1] https://www.facebook.com/notes/social-jobs-partnership/recruiting-survey-social-media-helps-connect-job-seekers-with-employers/404484379619706/

[2] https://moz.com/blog/1-dollar-per-day-on-facebook-ads

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Determining Whether an Applicant Tracking System is a Necessity for HR Professionals

image_05Before you make a decision about whether or not to use an applicant tracking system, consider what has happened to give rise to their use.

Gone are the days when job applicants typed their resumes, wrote a cover letter, mailed it and went through the same process for the next job. Now, applicants can post their resume online, and in just a short session at their computer, they can submit their resume to 10, 20 or more jobs without even considering if they meet the job requirements. The result? Recruiters are buried in online submissions.

To counter the enormous influx of resumes, many from clearly unqualified candidates, companies have resorted to applicant tracking systems to cull the number of resumes by identifying keywords that must appear in the resume before an actual recruiter sees it.

Often, a company will receive 250 or more resumes for an open position. Their applicant tracking system will only allow about 25 percent of those to move forward, but are they the right 25 percent? While the numbers support the success of using these systems, when you dig a little deeper, there’s often a gap between the use of keywords and the actual skills required for the job. Just because an applicant’s resume is worded to “beat the system” doesn’t mean he or she is qualified.

Applicant tracking systems are increasing in use, and they serve a real purpose, but there are some characteristics that should be considered before purchasing and installing one:

  • Make sure the system you purchase is mobile friendly. If it isn’t, you could be losing qualified candidates who move on to a more mobile-friendly application process at another company.
  • Ensure that your system allows qualified candidates who aren’t hired to go into a recruiting pipeline.
  • The filters in your system should not be too restrictive. For example, while an MBA may be preferred, a master’s degree in another area might be acceptable as well.

Many HR professionals see more value in a well-trained recruiter who can scan a large stack of resumes and sort them quickly into “unqualified,” “maybe” and “call for phone screen.” As job seekers become more familiar with the system, they’ll get better at presenting themselves as someone who uses the right words instead of someone who can do the job.