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5 Tips for Tweeting Jobs

Social media remains an amazing resource for companies seeking to attract quality candidates—without spending large sums of money. The “popcorn message” nature of Twitter allows businesses to present relevant information while skipping everything non-essential. However, it’s still up to you to make your tweets count. Here are a few tips to help you along.

Cover the essentials: Job title, responsibilities, location, and qualifications.

Answer direct messages: It’s impossible to explain the full scope of a job in 140 characters. Many job seekers root out further information by writing direct messages, that can in turn help you connect with potential hires.

Tweetup. Mix up your job posting by hosting hiring events, advertised in part by your Twitter account.

Join networks. If your “followers” list is a little slim, get the word out by joining job-specific networking groups. Your messages will be re-tweeted and you’ll get more impressions per post.

Don’t spam. If you post more than once or twice in day, you’ll be running the risk of annoying your base. Just like the length of your messages, keep things slim.

Good luck!

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4 Tips for Tweets

You’re turning to Twitter to update your customers and let them know what’s going on behind the scenes. You’re also using tweets to promote job openings—landing you the largest applicant pool you can, helping your HR department to recruit top talent. It’s a smart move. As more ‘net surfers turn to Twitter for news, information, and—let’s face it—recreation, maintaining a presence is just good business sense. Here are a few tips to make your tweets go from peeps to hoots.

Make it diverse. By changing up the tone and subject matter of your posts, you’re proving that there’s an actual human behind your machines. That’s a good thing.

Keep it to 140 characters. No, really. Short-linking makes it very easy to gush about your latest product or service, but people read Twitter because they like brevity. Give the people what they want.

Re-tweeting isn’t cheating. While your Twitter account shouldn’t be a directory of other people’s offerings, don’t be afraid to re-tweet the latest buzz from another source.

Be interesting. Seems easy, but the art of pushing out interesting content for users to consume is, well, an art. Some companies never get it right. The ones that do enjoy more online sales and better candidate pools.
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